• Boilermaker Magazine | September/October 2014
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    September/October 2014

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If your workplace is already organized

For most workers in an organized facility, membership in the union is automatic after a brief probationary period. However, 24 states have outlawed automatic enrollment: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

If you work in one of these states or a federal facility and you are not already a member, you can apply for membership by contacting one of the local lodge union officers or stewards. Application forms are not available online.

If your workplace is not organized

If the Boilermakers do not currently represent the employees at your workplace, perhaps you want to form a union and become members. To get started, simply fill out an information form, and we'll put you in touch with a professional organizer who can answer any questions you may have.

If you wish to work in field construction

Workers in industrial construction may become journey Boilermakers by entering the Boilermakers apprenticeship program in the United States or in Canada.

In some cases, experienced construction workers may be able to join the union without completing the apprentice program, based on the skills they have developed throughout their career. If you have several years experience in industrial construction and are skilled in welding, rigging, blueprint reading, tube rolling, and other work performed by Boilermakers, fill out our recruitment form. We are always looking for good workers who want to become good union members.

 

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